A moderator at Inke, one of the top live-streaming apps in China, uses image recognition technology as part of their daily job of scrutinising the livestreams of an estimated 250 million monthly active users. Photo: Lea Li

Inside China Tech: How live-streaming in China is monitored and censored

  • Analysing how one live-streaming company in mainland China censors user content, as western governments consider how to regulate Facebook and other tech giants.
  • Image recognition technology is used to identify cigarettes, cleavage, tattoos other behavior and content listed as unacceptable.
Topic |   Censorship in China

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A moderator at Inke, one of the top live-streaming apps in China, uses image recognition technology as part of their daily job of scrutinising the livestreams of an estimated 250 million monthly active users. Photo: Lea Li
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Zen Soo

Zen Soo

Zen Soo joined the Post in 2015. She covers China technology, in particular e-commerce, online to offline and mobile payments. She also writes about Southeast Asian tech companies.

Chua Kong Ho

Chua Kong Ho

Kong Ho is technology editor at the South China Morning Post.