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Science fiction
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  • From an opening terror attack to a climactic suicide mission in space, Frant Gwo and Liu Cixin present a dazzling New Year firework display
  • The film draws parallels with our attitudes to Covid-19, and engages with intriguing themes such as our over-reliance on technology and its surveillance of us
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These Asian science fiction films from the past 20 years, by directors such as S. Shankar, Joko Anwar and Frant Gwo, have been criminally neglected by international audiences.

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Louis Koo’s ambitious, big-budget sci-fi adventure sets new standards for Hong Kong special effects filmmaking, but a simplistic narrative and lack of character development make for a forgettable story.

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Korean movie director Choi Dong-hoon tells the Post about his love of science fiction, how he always wanted to make a sci-fi film, and how Netflix opened up the genre for Korean directors.

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Science fiction is the best literary genre to lead discussions on climate change because you can regard the whole universe as a collective living community, sci-fi writer Chen Qiufan says.

Adapted from the well-regarded 2014 film The Sea of Tranquility and starring Bae Doona and Gong Yoo, The Silent Sea starts terribly, is dull and repetitive, and lacks characterisation.

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A zombie apocalypse story, migrants from Mars, AI-human interaction – the diversity of Chinese science fiction writing new and old is celebrated in a volume of translated short stories.

Science fiction author Chen Qiufan and Kai-Fu Lee, former head of Google China, outline a positive vision for the future of artificial intelligence in their collaboration AI 2041. They tell the Post why.

Tsang is known for his films about teenage angst, such as the Oscar-nominated Better Days, prompting some in China to doubt his suitability to direct an episode of Chinese sci-fi adaptation Three-Body Problem for Netflix.

The idea of extraterrestrial life fuels writers’ and filmmakers’ imaginations and makes for an abundance of tantalising conspiracy theories about aliens out there monitoring us. But who can say with absolute certainty that there aren’t beings with higher intelligence in this planetary system and beyond?

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Terminal Boredom is the first of a planned series of English translations of the late Izumi Suzuki’s science fiction, and if these thought-provoking, dystopian tales are anything to go by, the Japanese writer’s work should have wide appeal.