Ship-breaking workers are often desperate for work no others will do, even if wages are slightly higher than the average sweatshop job. Photo: Studio FaschingShip-breaking workers are often desperate for work no others will do, even if wages are slightly higher than the average sweatshop job. Photo: Studio Fasching
Ship-breaking workers are often desperate for work no others will do, even if wages are slightly higher than the average sweatshop job. Photo: Studio Fasching

Two years since Pakistan’s Gadani ship-breaking disaster, why are workers still dying?

  • Despite the Hong Kong Convention, dismantling ships for raw materials or parts remains a dangerous, lawless industry.

Topic |   Pakistan
Ship-breaking workers are often desperate for work no others will do, even if wages are slightly higher than the average sweatshop job. Photo: Studio FaschingShip-breaking workers are often desperate for work no others will do, even if wages are slightly higher than the average sweatshop job. Photo: Studio Fasching
Ship-breaking workers are often desperate for work no others will do, even if wages are slightly higher than the average sweatshop job. Photo: Studio Fasching
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