India in 2005 declared leprosy was no longer a public health problem, yet it still accounts for most of the world’s cases. Photo: Handout
India in 2005 declared leprosy was no longer a public health problem, yet it still accounts for most of the world’s cases. Photo: Handout
India

India’s forgotten lepers have been quarantined all their lives

  • Ghulam Mohammad Dar has spent 40 years living in the Bahar-Aar Sanatorium, a leprosy colony in Kashmir
  • Despite medical advances in the treatment of leprosy, patients still endure the social stigma associated with the disease

India in 2005 declared leprosy was no longer a public health problem, yet it still accounts for most of the world’s cases. Photo: Handout
India in 2005 declared leprosy was no longer a public health problem, yet it still accounts for most of the world’s cases. Photo: Handout
READ FULL ARTICLE