Empty desks at an elementary school in Seoul. South Korean schools have opened up, but many students haven’t returned. Photo: EPA Empty desks at an elementary school in Seoul. South Korean schools have opened up, but many students haven’t returned. Photo: EPA
Empty desks at an elementary school in Seoul. South Korean schools have opened up, but many students haven’t returned. Photo: EPA

If South Korea is beating the coronavirus, why are so many of its people staying home?

  • South Koreans are staying away from offices, schools and places of worship despite infections falling
  • Experts say Covid-19 has woken people up to new ways of working and many are now loathe to go back

Topic |   Coronavirus pandemic
Empty desks at an elementary school in Seoul. South Korean schools have opened up, but many students haven’t returned. Photo: EPA Empty desks at an elementary school in Seoul. South Korean schools have opened up, but many students haven’t returned. Photo: EPA
Empty desks at an elementary school in Seoul. South Korean schools have opened up, but many students haven’t returned. Photo: EPA

Corrected [10:39pm, 10 Jun, 2020]

  • [10:39pm, 10 Jun, 2020]

    A sentence in this article has been changed. A previous version stated: Even before the pandemic, people in their 50s and 60s made 7.11 million purchases online last year, three times more than the 2.36 million purchases made in 2017 according to Hyundai Card and Hyundai Capital. The article now reads: Even before the pandemic, contactless consumption in services such as food delivery grew nearly five times from 6.7 billion won (US$5.6million) in 2017 to 35.9 billion won by 2019, according to the credit card transaction data from Hyundai Card.

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