Chris Lonsdale

Chris Lonsdale

Chris Lonsdale is a psychologist, linguist, educator, entrepreneur, dialogue facilitator and corporate adviser with over 30 years’ experience doing business in Asia  He is the creator of the Kungfu English mobile self-learning system, author of "The Third Ear" and "How to Learn Any Language in 6 Months" (in Chinese), and his TEDx talk on Language Learning is one of the top 10 TEDx videos of all time.

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Latest from Chris Lonsdale

Opinion | Hong Kong protests are a fight for the city’s identity as the ‘edge’ between Chinese and Western culture

Hong Kong’s identity is an example of what the field of ecology terms an ‘edge’ – a belt of life between two different ecological systems. Attempts by either side to assimilate the city – including the US’ push against Chinese influence – will destroy it.

8 Nov 2019 - 8:22PM

Hong Kong’s identity is an example of what the field of ecology terms an ‘edge’ – a belt of life between two different ecological systems. Attempts by either side to assimilate the city – including the US’ push against Chinese influence – will destroy it.

Hong Kong protests are a fight for the city’s identity as the ‘edge’ between Chinese and Western culture
Opinion | Hong Kong is no longer a colony, but officials still await instructions from on high – and that’s a problem

The local government still behaves like it’s overseeing a colony but has less leverage with Beijing than leaders of mainland cities. Receiving no instructions from Beijing has also led to many mistakes and a confused response to the protests.

29 Oct 2019 - 6:39AM

The local government still behaves like it’s overseeing a colony but has less leverage with Beijing than leaders of mainland cities. Receiving no instructions from Beijing has also led to many mistakes and a confused response to the protests.

Hong Kong is no longer a colony, but officials still await instructions from on high – and that’s a problem
Opinion | Hong Kong’s protests are rooted in something deeper than the economy or foreign interference: they’re about fear and identity

A large number of today’s Hongkongers fled from China during the Cultural Revolution, and protests reflect the trauma felt by them, and their descendants, at the lack of choice about their identity after 1997.

8 Oct 2019 - 11:10AM

A large number of today’s Hongkongers fled from China during the Cultural Revolution, and protests reflect the trauma felt by them, and their descendants, at the lack of choice about their identity after 1997.

Hong Kong’s protests are rooted in something deeper than the economy or foreign interference: they’re about fear and identity