Neil Newman
Neil Newman
Neil Newman is a thematic portfolio strategist focused on pan-Asian equity markets. Experienced in the major global financial centres of Tokyo, London and New York, he is a regular commentator on commercial investment strategies that suit constantly changing investor trends. He is a long-term resident of Hong Kong.

We need to hear fewer inspirational quotes from cartoon characters such as Daddy Pig or Kermit the Frog, and more from the UK leader’s wartime idol, writes Neil Newman.

Older second-hand cars are largely shunned in Hong Kong but sought after overseas by owner-driver-investors. Could these be an astute purchase, asks Neil Newman.

Until we reach the pandemic’s final act and can see a happy ending, let’s be more like beloved animated character Doraemon and focus on the positives, write Neil Newman.

Ultravox fan Neil Newman Dances with Tears in His Eyes and Laments over dumping his record collection during a Sleepwalk, as he ponders if transferring art exclusively into the digital world is the right move.

Grande idea: by harnessing the power of real intelligence, not the artificial kind, a café in Tokyo is using robots to serve customers their daily cup of Joe.

In Japan, where the state foots the bill, you get three square meals a day and are trusted not to do a runner. All you need to do is iron your own toast, writes Neil Newman.

The city’s leisure and F&B industry is once again in crisis and it’s up to the Hong Kong Musicians Union to ensure entertainers aren’t cut off from government relief.

The rising price of lithium – and the environmental cost of throwing batteries away – threatens demand unless manufacturers are willing to think outside the box, writes Neil Newman.

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It may not be ‘war’ by its standard definition, or even a cold war, but geopolitical conflict in this century is being waged through the weaponisation of relationships and people, writes Neil Newman.

It’s hard to imagine Australians are short of urea, the humble chemical that goes daily down the dunny, but a dwindling supply threatens to cripple the country, writes Neil Newman.

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Hong Kong is caught between a rock and a hard place in opening up the border: by opting for free movement with China, it can’t open up to foreign travel from elsewhere.

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The city is rich and can ride things out by giving away free money to puff up GDP. But it is becoming poor in other ways and risks missing out as the rest of the world speeds past, writes Neil Newman.

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Stock markets are going to crash, it’s just a matter of when. So there is some housekeeping to be done now. With gold surprisingly in a downtrend, perhaps it is time to have a look before everyone else notices.

The quarter-century experiment had the best of intentions, but it has ultimately failed. Rather than playing the blame game, isn’t it time for a new approach, writes Neil Newman.

The increasing nationalism of Chinese consumers, as much as supply chain issues and Covid-related disruptions, is the reason international firms are moving overseas, writes Neil Newman.

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