Tracey Fallon

Tracey Fallon

Tracey Fallon is an assistant professor of China studies at the University of Nottingham Ningbo China.

Latest from Tracey Fallon

Opinion | US-China rivalry and the danger of using history to justify moral right

Both the US and China use history such as the Cold War and the Eight-Nation Alliance to bolster their positions and criticise the other side. The risk is that Washington could end up feeding Beijing’s narrative of Western imperialism, narrowing the scope for de-escalation.

Both the US and China use history such as the Cold War and the Eight-Nation Alliance to bolster their positions and criticise the other side. The risk is that Washington could end up feeding Beijing’s narrative of Western imperialism, narrowing the scope for de-escalation.

2 Oct 2021 - 3:30AM
Opinion | How China’s treatment of international students hurts its public diplomacy

International students remain barred from returning to China, and some are venting their frustration on Twitter. China’s inability to control user responses is undermining its social media messaging and the reputation of its higher education sector.

International students remain barred from returning to China, and some are venting their frustration on Twitter. China’s inability to control user responses is undermining its social media messaging and the reputation of its higher education sector.

17 Jun 2021 - 1:51AM
Opinion | China cannot just rely on its economic might to silence the growing army of critics

From the Hong Kong protests to the treatment of Uygurs in Xinjiang, China’s international image has seen severely dented this year. It must work to repair the damage through persuasion and co-option, not just by leaning on its economic stature.

From the Hong Kong protests to the treatment of Uygurs in Xinjiang, China’s international image has seen severely dented this year. It must work to repair the damage through persuasion and co-option, not just by leaning on its economic stature.

27 Dec 2019 - 9:30AM
Opinion | China’s soft-power play: what will it take to get it just right and hit the Goldilocks zone?

After years of trying to win friends and gain influence through its outreach programmes, Beijing has run into a wall. The reason is twofold: China must improve its art of persuasion, and the West it seeks to impress must be willing to come to the party.

After years of trying to win friends and gain influence through its outreach programmes, Beijing has run into a wall. The reason is twofold: China must improve its art of persuasion, and the West it seeks to impress must be willing to come to the party.

16 Jan 2019 - 8:50AM