Adolfo Arranz

Adolfo Arranz joined the Post in 2011, after more than 10 years as an infographic artist for the Spanish newspaper El Mundo. He has also worked as creative director at Mediacorp in Singapore. He has won multiple design awards during his career.
Adolfo Arranz
Adolfo Arranz joined the Post in 2011, after more than 10 years as an infographic artist for the Spanish newspaper El Mundo. He has also worked as creative director at Mediacorp in Singapore. He has won multiple design awards during his career.

Latest from Adolfo Arranz

When China wanted silver from the rest of the world

A Pacific route to and from Spanish America made China an economic powerhouse 400 years ago.

6 Feb 2019 - 8:04AM

A Pacific route to and from Spanish America made China an economic powerhouse 400 years ago.

When China wanted silver from the rest of the world
How the Forbidden City’s treasures ended up divided between Beijing and Taipei

Many of the Forbidden City’s ancient treasures were evacuated from the Palace Museum in Beijing when Japan launched a full-scale invasion of China.

3 Feb 2019 - 8:30PM

Many of the Forbidden City’s ancient treasures were evacuated from the Palace Museum in Beijing when Japan launched a full-scale invasion of China.

How the Forbidden City’s treasures ended up divided between Beijing and Taipei
How the Chinese empire became the master of its own destruction

China’s powerful dynasties were all but impregnable to outside influence for more than four millennia. But in the 19th century an inward-looking Chinese empire became master of its own destruction when the regime failed to reform and modernise.

2 Feb 2019 - 3:03PM

China’s powerful dynasties were all but impregnable to outside influence for more than four millennia. But in the 19th century an inward-looking Chinese empire became master of its own destruction when the regime failed to reform and modernise.

How the Chinese empire became the master of its own destruction
The tragedy of the oil tanker Aulac Fortune
The wandering treasure of the Forbidden City
How the death of the Qing Empire, China's last dynasty, gave life to the Palace Museum

China’s powerful dynasties were all but impregnable to outside influence for more than four millennia. But in the 19th century an inward-looking Chinese empire became master of its own destruction when the regime failed to reform and modernise. The imperial system collapsed at the start of the 20th century and the Forbidden City, which had been home to emperors since 1420 and housed the world’s greatest collection of art treasures, was turned over to the public and transformed into the Palace Museum.

17 Dec 2018 - 12:49PM

China’s powerful dynasties were all but impregnable to outside influence for more than four millennia. But in the 19th century an inward-looking Chinese empire became master of its own destruction when the regime failed to reform and modernise. The imperial system collapsed at the start of the 20th century and the Forbidden City, which had been home to emperors since 1420 and housed the world’s greatest collection of art treasures, was turned over to the public and transformed into the Palace Museum.

How the death of the Qing Empire, China's last dynasty, gave life to the Palace Museum
How the Forbidden City became the Palace Museum after China's Qing Dynasty was overthrown

Bloody war and revolution: one of the world’s greatest museums rose from the ashes when imperial China toppled

12 Dec 2018 - 6:19PM

Bloody war and revolution: one of the world’s greatest museums rose from the ashes when imperial China toppled

How the Forbidden City became the Palace Museum after China's Qing Dynasty was overthrown
From war camps to Occupy: how South China Morning Post covered Hong Kong history

The South China Morning Post has been a barometer of daily life in Hong Kong since it was founded 115 years ago. From its earliest days, the paper campaigned for more enlightened governance, and the newspaper’s reporters have experienced the same highs and lows as the rest of the city, including such indignities as being barred from society, detained in POW camps and being targets of rioting mobs

13 Nov 2018 - 6:19PM

The South China Morning Post has been a barometer of daily life in Hong Kong since it was founded 115 years ago. From its earliest days, the paper campaigned for more enlightened governance, and the newspaper’s reporters have experienced the same highs and lows as the rest of the city, including such indignities as being barred from society, detained in POW camps and being targets of rioting mobs

From war camps to Occupy: how South China Morning Post covered Hong Kong history
Beijing is betting big on biotech as a key sector in its ‘Made in China 2025’ industrial strategy
Crazy rich Asian wealth gap: billionaire budgets border extreme poverty
Hong Kong needs more lifeguards. What does it take to become one?
Mars opposition and blood moon lunar eclipse: look to the skies for a rare celestial event
Everything you need to know about Bruce Lee, who died 45 years ago
How Fifa World Cup soccer stars play at the dark arts of the not-so-beautiful game
The 120-year story of Hong Kong's iconic Star Ferry
How silver changed the world
15 Nov 2018 - 9:36AM
How silver changed the world
A journey of dread: a survivor's account of early global trade
Galleon of China: flagship of trade over two centuries
The discovery of the round trip and the beginning of globalisation
Bombs over Hong Kong
20 Jul 2018 - 8:47PM
Bombs over Hong Kong
The infographic that shows just how safe the skies were in 2017
How the Sanchi oil tanker environmental disaster unfolded
Don't know anything about wine? Here's a crash course
North Korea: all you need to know about the isolated state with nuclear ambitions
Cockroach: take a look at the anatomy of a born survivor
Liaoning: everything you need to know about China’s first aircraft carrier
Take a tour of the five biggest Belt and Road Initiative projects
Visualising the budget: How Paul Chan stacks up
Sketching in the Court
13 Mar 2017 - 4:39PM
Sketching in the Court
China invests billions in the US ... who gets the most?