Adolfo Arranz

Adolfo Arranz joined the Post in 2011, after more than 10 years as an infographic artist for the Spanish newspaper El Mundo. He has also worked as creative director at Mediacorp in Singapore. He has won multiple design awards during his career.
Adolfo Arranz
Adolfo Arranz joined the Post in 2011, after more than 10 years as an infographic artist for the Spanish newspaper El Mundo. He has also worked as creative director at Mediacorp in Singapore. He has won multiple design awards during his career.

Latest from Adolfo Arranz

The China Ship: the beginning of modern globalisation

This four-part story has won 22 international awards, most recently for the Spanish-language version at the Society for News Design's "Best of Ibero-American Journalistic Design, ÑH19"

17 Oct 2019 - 3:28PM

This four-part story has won 22 international awards, most recently for the Spanish-language version at the Society for News Design's "Best of Ibero-American Journalistic Design, ÑH19"

The China Ship: the beginning of modern globalisation
Did Bruce Lee create mixed martial arts in Hong Kong?

The Chinese-American film and television superstar Bruce Lee was a disciplined athlete with legendary martial arts skills. 

7 Oct 2019 - 11:43AM

The Chinese-American film and television superstar Bruce Lee was a disciplined athlete with legendary martial arts skills. 

Did Bruce Lee create mixed martial arts in Hong Kong?
The People’s Republic of China: 70 years of changes

China’s rise has been impressive by many standards. There is no clearer indication of the country's progress than its share of the world economy. Measured in purchasing power parity, China’s share of global GDP fell from an estimated 32 per cent in 1820 - when Qing dynasty emperor Daoguang began his reign - to a mere 5 per cent at the end of the Cultural Revolution in 1976. And yet, by last year, China’s share had climbed to nearly 19 per cent.

9 Oct 2019 - 8:28PM

China’s rise has been impressive by many standards. There is no clearer indication of the country's progress than its share of the world economy. Measured in purchasing power parity, China’s share of global GDP fell from an estimated 32 per cent in 1820 - when Qing dynasty emperor Daoguang began his reign - to a mere 5 per cent at the end of the Cultural Revolution in 1976. And yet, by last year, China’s share had climbed to nearly 19 per cent.

The People’s Republic of China: 70 years of changes
Hong Kong protests: from 2014’s Occupy movement to 2019’s anti-government rallies

Five years ago, at 5.57pm on September 28, police fired tear gas for the first time at hundreds of thousands of Hongkongers, triggering the 79-day Occupy movement. Fast forward to the present and Hong Kong is again in the throes of an anti-government protest, sparked by a now-shelved extradition bill, this time bigger and more defiant. Here is a look at the key differences between the two movements.

28 Sep 2019 - 11:11AM

Five years ago, at 5.57pm on September 28, police fired tear gas for the first time at hundreds of thousands of Hongkongers, triggering the 79-day Occupy movement. Fast forward to the present and Hong Kong is again in the throes of an anti-government protest, sparked by a now-shelved extradition bill, this time bigger and more defiant. Here is a look at the key differences between the two movements.

Hong Kong protests: from 2014’s Occupy movement to 2019’s anti-government rallies
The evolution of Hong Kong’s protesters

The anti-extradition bill protests have lasted longer than 2014’s Occupy movement. Here we compare today’s protesters, who continue to shock the world, to their predecessors.

10 Sep 2019 - 6:16PM

The anti-extradition bill protests have lasted longer than 2014’s Occupy movement. Here we compare today’s protesters, who continue to shock the world, to their predecessors.

The evolution of Hong Kong’s protesters
How Hong Kong airport protests ended in chaos

Unprecedented scenes of violence broke out at the Hong Kong International Airport after thousands of anti-government protesters occupying the airport terminal building brought flights to a halt for two days straight. This is how the events unfolded

4 Sep 2019 - 4:43PM

Unprecedented scenes of violence broke out at the Hong Kong International Airport after thousands of anti-government protesters occupying the airport terminal building brought flights to a halt for two days straight. This is how the events unfolded

How Hong Kong airport protests ended in chaos
Rare earths are found in everyday items, from TVs to smartphones and fridges

There are 17 rare earth elements in the periodic table which, contrary to their name, are as abundant in the Earth’s crust as tin or lead.

17 Jul 2019 - 2:00PM

There are 17 rare earth elements in the periodic table which, contrary to their name, are as abundant in the Earth’s crust as tin or lead.

Rare earths are found in everyday items, from TVs to smartphones and fridges
The history of the Forbidden City
Will Beijing weaponise its rare earth supply in the US-China trade war?

There are 17 rare earth elements listed in the periodic table which, contrary to their name, are as abundant in the Earth’s crust as tin or lead. However, rare earths are always fused with other minerals which makes many countries reluctant to invest in rare earth mines because they are too expensive and polluting to extract and refine in commercially viable quantities

29 Jun 2019 - 8:19AM

There are 17 rare earth elements listed in the periodic table which, contrary to their name, are as abundant in the Earth’s crust as tin or lead. However, rare earths are always fused with other minerals which makes many countries reluctant to invest in rare earth mines because they are too expensive and polluting to extract and refine in commercially viable quantities

Will Beijing weaponise its rare earth supply in the US-China trade war?
Tiananmen Square crackdown: 21 most-wanted student leaders’ stories

A week after armed forces cleared Tiananmen Square the Beijing Public Security Bureau distributed a circular of the pro-democracy movement’s 21 most wanted student leaders. Here’s what happened to them.

5 Jun 2019 - 5:15AM

A week after armed forces cleared Tiananmen Square the Beijing Public Security Bureau distributed a circular of the pro-democracy movement’s 21 most wanted student leaders. Here’s what happened to them.

Tiananmen Square crackdown: 21 most-wanted student leaders’ stories
Godzilla: evolution of a monster

Sixty-five years after Godzilla first stomped onto our screens in the 1954 Japanese film, the radioactive monster is back again.

29 May 2019 - 5:32PM

Sixty-five years after Godzilla first stomped onto our screens in the 1954 Japanese film, the radioactive monster is back again.

Godzilla: evolution of a monster
How Bruce Lee and street fighting in Hong Kong helped create MMA
Hindenburg disaster: The end of the airship era

Eighty-two years ago on May 6, 1937, the German airship LZ129 Hindenburg claimed 36 lives when it caught fire at New Jersey in the United States.

6 May 2019 - 8:02PM

Eighty-two years ago on May 6, 1937, the German airship LZ129 Hindenburg claimed 36 lives when it caught fire at New Jersey in the United States.

Hindenburg disaster: The end of the airship era
How Forbidden City treasures survived modern China’s bloody beginning

When imperial rule collapsed in China at the beginning of the 20th century, the emperor’s Forbidden City home was turned over to the public and transformed into the Palace Museum. Fierce fighting that rocked the country for years after the leadership change posed a grave threat to the palace treasures – considered one of the world’s greatest collections of art and artefacts. To protect them, the Palace Museum director decided to evacuate a large number of items and set them on a 14-year, 75,000km (46,600-mile) journey.

4 May 2019 - 10:00AM

When imperial rule collapsed in China at the beginning of the 20th century, the emperor’s Forbidden City home was turned over to the public and transformed into the Palace Museum. Fierce fighting that rocked the country for years after the leadership change posed a grave threat to the palace treasures – considered one of the world’s greatest collections of art and artefacts. To protect them, the Palace Museum director decided to evacuate a large number of items and set them on a 14-year, 75,000km (46,600-mile) journey.

How Forbidden City treasures survived modern China’s bloody beginning
Belt and Road Initiative explained: How China is looking beyond borders

The “Belt and Road Initiative” was announced by the Chinese government in 2013 as a global trade strategy based on the ancient Silk Road trading route.

10 May 2019 - 5:34PM

The “Belt and Road Initiative” was announced by the Chinese government in 2013 as a global trade strategy based on the ancient Silk Road trading route.

Belt and Road Initiative explained: How China is looking beyond borders
When China wanted silver from the rest of the world

A Pacific route to and from Spanish America made China an economic powerhouse 400 years ago.

6 Feb 2019 - 8:04AM

A Pacific route to and from Spanish America made China an economic powerhouse 400 years ago.

When China wanted silver from the rest of the world
How the Forbidden City’s treasures ended up divided between Beijing and Taipei

Many of the Forbidden City’s ancient treasures were evacuated from the Palace Museum in Beijing when Japan launched a full-scale invasion of China.

3 Feb 2019 - 8:30PM

Many of the Forbidden City’s ancient treasures were evacuated from the Palace Museum in Beijing when Japan launched a full-scale invasion of China.

How the Forbidden City’s treasures ended up divided between Beijing and Taipei
How the Chinese empire became the master of its own destruction

China’s powerful dynasties were all but impregnable to outside influence for more than four millennia. But in the 19th century an inward-looking Chinese empire became master of its own destruction when the regime failed to reform and modernise.

2 Feb 2019 - 3:03PM

China’s powerful dynasties were all but impregnable to outside influence for more than four millennia. But in the 19th century an inward-looking Chinese empire became master of its own destruction when the regime failed to reform and modernise.

How the Chinese empire became the master of its own destruction
The tragedy of the oil tanker Aulac Fortune
The wandering treasure of the Forbidden City
How the death of the Qing Empire, China's last dynasty, gave life to the Palace Museum

China’s powerful dynasties were all but impregnable to outside influence for more than four millennia. But in the 19th century an inward-looking Chinese empire became master of its own destruction when the regime failed to reform and modernise. The imperial system collapsed at the start of the 20th century and the Forbidden City, which had been home to emperors since 1420 and housed the world’s greatest collection of art treasures, was turned over to the public and transformed into the Palace Museum.

17 Dec 2018 - 12:49PM

China’s powerful dynasties were all but impregnable to outside influence for more than four millennia. But in the 19th century an inward-looking Chinese empire became master of its own destruction when the regime failed to reform and modernise. The imperial system collapsed at the start of the 20th century and the Forbidden City, which had been home to emperors since 1420 and housed the world’s greatest collection of art treasures, was turned over to the public and transformed into the Palace Museum.

How the death of the Qing Empire, China's last dynasty, gave life to the Palace Museum
How the Forbidden City became the Palace Museum after China's Qing Dynasty was overthrown

Bloody war and revolution: one of the world’s greatest museums rose from the ashes when imperial China toppled

12 Dec 2018 - 6:19PM

Bloody war and revolution: one of the world’s greatest museums rose from the ashes when imperial China toppled

How the Forbidden City became the Palace Museum after China's Qing Dynasty was overthrown
From war camps to Occupy: how South China Morning Post covered Hong Kong history

The South China Morning Post has been a barometer of daily life in Hong Kong since it was founded 115 years ago. From its earliest days, the paper campaigned for more enlightened governance, and the newspaper’s reporters have experienced the same highs and lows as the rest of the city, including such indignities as being barred from society, detained in POW camps and being targets of rioting mobs

13 Nov 2018 - 6:19PM

The South China Morning Post has been a barometer of daily life in Hong Kong since it was founded 115 years ago. From its earliest days, the paper campaigned for more enlightened governance, and the newspaper’s reporters have experienced the same highs and lows as the rest of the city, including such indignities as being barred from society, detained in POW camps and being targets of rioting mobs

From war camps to Occupy: how South China Morning Post covered Hong Kong history
Beijing is betting big on biotech as a key sector in its ‘Made in China 2025’ industrial strategy
Crazy rich Asian wealth gap: billionaire budgets border extreme poverty
Hong Kong needs more lifeguards. What does it take to become one?
Mars opposition and blood moon lunar eclipse: look to the skies for a rare celestial event
Everything you need to know about Bruce Lee, who died 45 years ago
How Fifa World Cup soccer stars play at the dark arts of the not-so-beautiful game
The 120-year story of Hong Kong's iconic Star Ferry