John Gong

Dr John Gong is a professor of economics at the University of International Business and Economics in Beijing, where he teaches and researches in areas of finance, industrial organisation, and competition policies. He is a prolific researcher and writer with a list of publications in leading international academic journals, and an op-ed columnist for several newspapers in Asia.
John Gong
Dr John Gong is a professor of economics at the University of International Business and Economics in Beijing, where he teaches and researches in areas of finance, industrial organisation, and competition policies. He is a prolific researcher and writer with a list of publications in leading international academic journals, and an op-ed columnist for several newspapers in Asia.

Latest from John Gong

China and the US must narrow the trade gap by boosting trade, rather than curbing it
Corporate China in danger of a crash
China's unjust labour camps must go
Chinese boycott of Japanese products over Diaoyus makes no sense
The missing Chinese in the Chinese dream
How fair is China's crackdown on anti-monopoly behaviour?

The dairy industry is probably the sickest industry in China. Its products are sick. Its managers cheat. The indigenous dairy industry has witnessed one scandal after another, from melamine milk to leather milk and other chemical formulations that are beyond people's imagination. The dairy industry is so sick that consumers in China have totally abandoned indigenous brands, opting for imports instead.

9 Aug 2013 - 2:31AM

The dairy industry is probably the sickest industry in China. Its products are sick. Its managers cheat. The indigenous dairy industry has witnessed one scandal after another, from melamine milk to leather milk and other chemical formulations that are beyond people's imagination. The dairy industry is so sick that consumers in China have totally abandoned indigenous brands, opting for imports instead.

How fair is China's crackdown on anti-monopoly behaviour?
Nexen deal shows how Chinese firms can do business in US

The fact that China National Offshore Oil Corporation's US$15.1 billion acquisition of Calgary-based Nexen went through successfully, with the required US approval, shows that direct investment capital flows from China are not always subject to political hijacking, as many on the mainland claim.

18 Mar 2013 - 1:41AM

The fact that China National Offshore Oil Corporation's US$15.1 billion acquisition of Calgary-based Nexen went through successfully, with the required US approval, shows that direct investment capital flows from China are not always subject to political hijacking, as many on the mainland claim.

Nexen deal shows how Chinese firms can do business in US