Kit Gillet

Latest from Kit Gillet

Myanmar’s beauty and troubles laid bare in A Savage Dreamland by David Eimer

Writer David Eimer travels to far flung corners of the country formerly known as Burma to better understand its present.

30 May 2019 - 6:30PM

Writer David Eimer travels to far flung corners of the country formerly known as Burma to better understand its present.

Myanmar’s beauty and troubles laid bare in A Savage Dreamland by David Eimer
Home Remedies: stories of China’s young and listless, and of challenges of being a second-generation immigrant
Review | Maoism: A Global History – how China exported revolution around the world

In Maoism: A Global History, China scholar Julia Lovell explains Mao-era China’s influence across the globe, funding insurgencies from Africa to Nepal to Peru, and inspiring others closer to home in Cambodia and Malaya.

8 Mar 2019 - 10:28AM

In Maoism: A Global History, China scholar Julia Lovell explains Mao-era China’s influence across the globe, funding insurgencies from Africa to Nepal to Peru, and inspiring others closer to home in Cambodia and Malaya.

Maoism: A Global History – how China exported revolution around the world
Review | Poacher: journalist Kimon de Greef’s study of illegal abalone trade suffers from narrow world view

With Chinese demand fuelling the illicit trade, the otherwise engaging book’s message would have benefited from a broader perspective

4 Oct 2018 - 6:30PM

With Chinese demand fuelling the illicit trade, the otherwise engaging book’s message would have benefited from a broader perspective

Poacher: journalist Kimon de Greef’s study of illegal abalone trade suffers from narrow world view
Review | Sin city: book exposes gritty underbelly of 1930s Shanghai

The chancers, adventurers and criminals who made and lost fortunes in China treaty port teetering on the edge of chaos

15 Mar 2018 - 9:45AM

The chancers, adventurers and criminals who made and lost fortunes in China treaty port teetering on the edge of chaos

Sin city: book exposes gritty underbelly of 1930s Shanghai
Review | Story of Sea Shepherd’s epic high-seas hunt for poachers revealed in new book

One of Catching Thunder’s strongest points is that the authors – investigative journalists who accompanied the chasing vessel – track down players on each side, piecing together their testimonies on the 110-day chase

22 Feb 2018 - 10:10AM

One of Catching Thunder’s strongest points is that the authors – investigative journalists who accompanied the chasing vessel – track down players on each side, piecing together their testimonies on the 110-day chase

Story of Sea Shepherd’s epic  high-seas hunt for poachers revealed in new book
Review | Book review: how Myanmar squandered its promise of peace and prosperity after the end of military rule

Since the junta made way for democratic rule in 2011, deadly outbreaks of violence between Buddhists and Muslims have scarred the country. Francis Wade creates an impressively detailed picture of the tensions inside Myanmar

28 Aug 2017 - 12:12PM

Since the junta made way for democratic rule in 2011, deadly outbreaks of violence between Buddhists and Muslims have scarred the country. Francis Wade creates an impressively detailed picture of the tensions inside Myanmar

Book review: how Myanmar squandered its promise of peace and prosperity after the end of military rule
Review | Book review: Ghosts of the Tsunami’s heart-wrenching look at Japan tragedy from survivors’ view leaves a lasting impression

Richard Lloyd Parry’s focus on those caught up in the events of that tragic day, especially relatives of the 74 children killed at Okawa Elementary School, truly highlights the small decisions that spell the difference between life and death

20 Jul 2018 - 2:55PM

Richard Lloyd Parry’s focus on those caught up in the events of that tragic day, especially relatives of the 74 children killed at Okawa Elementary School, truly highlights the small decisions that spell the difference between life and death

Book review: Ghosts of the Tsunami’s heart-wrenching look at Japan tragedy from survivors’ view leaves a lasting impression
Review | Return of religion to China since the death of Mao documented in new book The Souls of China

By following individual monks and priests, Pulitzer Prize-winning author Ian Johnson personalises his account of the reawakening of religious belief and practices in China in this timely and important book

13 Apr 2017 - 11:43AM

By following individual monks and priests, Pulitzer Prize-winning author Ian Johnson personalises his account of the reawakening of religious belief and practices in China in this timely and important book

Return of religion to China since the death of Mao documented in new book The Souls of China
Review | History of Laos’ secret war – and the way it transformed the CIA – reveals a sobering legacy

Joshua Kurlantzick’s engaging new history says the secret war in Southeast Asia was the beginning of the modern CIA – no longer merely an intelligence-gathering agency

24 Jul 2018 - 4:43PM

Joshua Kurlantzick’s engaging new history says the secret war in Southeast Asia was the beginning of the modern CIA – no longer merely an intelligence-gathering agency

History of Laos’ secret war – and the way it transformed the CIA – reveals a sobering legacy
Review | Book review: China, US bound by suspicion and hope

John Pomfret’s history of the friends-to-allies-to-enemies-and-back-again relationship between China and America is a masterful account of the ties that have shaped the foremost powers in the world today

20 Jul 2018 - 2:54PM

John Pomfret’s history of the friends-to-allies-to-enemies-and-back-again relationship between China and America is a masterful account of the ties that have shaped the foremost powers in the world today

Book review: China, US bound by suspicion and hope
Travel back in time with a trip to Romanian rural idyll

The countryside of Maramures, where farmers still use long scythes and home-made wooden pitchforks and there's no TV or internet, gives visitors a taste of how rural life was in much of Europe two centuries ago, writes Kit Gillet

26 Apr 2016 - 3:09PM

The countryside of Maramures, where farmers still use long scythes and home-made wooden pitchforks and there's no TV or internet, gives visitors a taste of how rural life was in much of Europe two centuries ago, writes Kit Gillet

Travel back in time with a trip to Romanian rural idyll
Review | Book review: Darjeeling by Jeff Koehler - trouble's brewing for the 'champagne of tea'

Jeff Koehler tells the colourful story of tea growing in India's Darjeeling region, from its accidental start to its uncertain future.

6 May 2015 - 10:16AM

Jeff Koehler tells the colourful story of tea growing in India's Darjeeling region, from its accidental start to its uncertain future.

Book review: Darjeeling by Jeff Koehler - trouble's brewing for the 'champagne of tea'
Second Kashmir novel looks at land torn apart by war

Mirza Waheed's second Kashmir-set novel evokes sadness for a beautiful land torn apart by war, writes Kit Gillet.

15 Nov 2014 - 8:16PM

Mirza Waheed's second Kashmir-set novel evokes sadness for a beautiful land torn apart by war, writes Kit Gillet.

Second Kashmir novel looks at land torn apart by war
Book review: Napoleon the Great by Andrew Roberts

Few people in history have achieved more in their lifetime than Napoleon Bonaparte, and it quickly becomes clear in this latest in a long line of biographies just how fitting the title "Napoleon the Great" is.

1 Nov 2014 - 11:11PM

Few people in history have achieved more in their lifetime than Napoleon Bonaparte, and it quickly becomes clear in this latest in a long line of biographies just how fitting the title "Napoleon the Great" is.

Book review: Napoleon the Great by Andrew Roberts
Book review: This Divided Island, by Samanth Subramanian

"Gradually, in my head, the boundaries between these slices of time - between wartime and post-war Sri Lanka - melted away. The phrase 'post-war' lost its meaning," journalist Samanth Subramanian writes in This Divided Island.

21 Sep 2014 - 11:07AM

"Gradually, in my head, the boundaries between these slices of time - between wartime and post-war Sri Lanka - melted away. The phrase 'post-war' lost its meaning," journalist Samanth Subramanian writes in This Divided Island.

Book review: This Divided Island, by Samanth Subramanian
Book review: Death Fugue by Sheng Keyi

Death Fugue, Sheng Keyi's second novel to be translated into English after Northern Girls, is, at its core, an absurdist take on the legacy of June 4, 1989, and the totalitarian nature of the Chinese government still in place today.

14 Sep 2014 - 1:28PM

Death Fugue, Sheng Keyi's second novel to be translated into English after Northern Girls, is, at its core, an absurdist take on the legacy of June 4, 1989, and the totalitarian nature of the Chinese government still in place today.

Book review: Death Fugue by Sheng Keyi
Book review: The Dog: Stories by Jack Livings

Disregarding his own health, and barely able to visit his dying wife in hospital, Zhou Yuqing sacrifices everything in an attempt to finish Mao Zedong's crystal sarcophagus in time for the opening of his mausoleum in 10 months' time.

24 Aug 2014 - 10:54AM

Disregarding his own health, and barely able to visit his dying wife in hospital, Zhou Yuqing sacrifices everything in an attempt to finish Mao Zedong's crystal sarcophagus in time for the opening of his mausoleum in 10 months' time.

Book review: The Dog: Stories by Jack Livings
Book review: Thirty-one Nil - On the Road with Football's Outsiders: a World Cup Odyssey, by James Montague

If you are looking for a timely antidote to the blanket coverage of lucratively paid footballers competing in the World Cup in Brazil starting next Thursday, it's time to grab a copy of Thirty-One Nil, a gripping tale of some of the many underdogs who dreamed, however briefly, of playing alongside the likes of Ronaldo and Messi.

8 Jun 2014 - 3:52PM

If you are looking for a timely antidote to the blanket coverage of lucratively paid footballers competing in the World Cup in Brazil starting next Thursday, it's time to grab a copy of Thirty-One Nil, a gripping tale of some of the many underdogs who dreamed, however briefly, of playing alongside the likes of Ronaldo and Messi.

Book review: Thirty-one Nil - On the Road with Football's Outsiders: a World Cup Odyssey, by James Montague
Up against the wall

Palestinians in the West Bank, which is being sealed off behind a barrier, continue to live their lives in limbo. Kit Gillet looks at the reality on the ground following the collapse of the latest round of peace talks with Israel. Pictures by Jeffrey Lau.

25 May 2014 - 6:52AM

Palestinians in the West Bank, which is being sealed off behind a barrier, continue to live their lives in limbo. Kit Gillet looks at the reality on the ground following the collapse of the latest round of peace talks with Israel. Pictures by Jeffrey Lau.

Up against the wall
The complications and contradictions of China in a time of great change

Evan Osnos, a staff writer at The New Yorker, recently left China after eight years covering the country, but not before writing a book on China's Age of Ambition , due to be released in early May. He spoke to Kit Gillet.

20 Apr 2014 - 12:35PM

Evan Osnos, a staff writer at The New Yorker, recently left China after eight years covering the country, but not before writing a book on China's Age of Ambition , due to be released in early May. He spoke to Kit Gillet.

The complications and contradictions of China in a time of great change
Book review: Mr Selden's Map of China, by Timothy Brook

In 2009, scholars at Oxford University found themselves looking down at an ancient Chinese map that hadn't been seen for almost a century.

10 Mar 2014 - 6:47PM

In 2009, scholars at Oxford University found themselves looking down at an ancient Chinese map that hadn't been seen for almost a century.

Book review: Mr Selden's Map of China, by Timothy Brook
Combat zone: the fight against malaria in Cambodia

For decades, a province in western Cambodia has been ground zero for drug-resistant strains of malaria. Now, a number of organisations are hoping to end the disease's deadly grip once and for all. Kit Gillet visits Pailin. Pictures by Jeffrey Lau.

25 Feb 2014 - 6:12PM

For decades, a province in western Cambodia has been ground zero for drug-resistant strains of malaria. Now, a number of organisations are hoping to end the disease's deadly grip once and for all. Kit Gillet visits Pailin. Pictures by Jeffrey Lau.

Combat zone: the fight against malaria in Cambodia
Book review: Junkyard Planet, by Adam Minter

By the 1970s, the United States was a veritable scrapyard, with rusting cars and abandoned farming and factory equipment scattered all over the country. But then the Chinese came, Adam Minter writes in Junkyard Planet, his tour de force journey through the global scrap trade.

10 Nov 2013 - 5:17PM

By the 1970s, the United States was a veritable scrapyard, with rusting cars and abandoned farming and factory equipment scattered all over the country. But then the Chinese came, Adam Minter writes in Junkyard Planet, his tour de force journey through the global scrap trade.

Book review: Junkyard Planet, by Adam Minter
A slight catch: Thailand's overfishing crisis

As overfishing empties Thailand's seas, Kit Gillet meets some of those desperate to take what is left and a local who is fighting back. Pictures by Luke Duggleby.

21 Oct 2013 - 11:05AM

As overfishing empties Thailand's seas, Kit Gillet meets some of those desperate to take what is left and a local who is fighting back. Pictures by Luke Duggleby.

A slight catch: Thailand's overfishing crisis
Kitesurfing takes off in Mui Ne, Vietnam
White paper on retirement age prompts fresh debate
Rich tourists an easy target for robbers abroad
Book review: Two Billion Eyes - the Story of China Central Television

In the most populous country on the planet, a nation where information is heavily controlled, there is perhaps nothing more powerful (or scary) than a state-controlled television network with a near-monopoly on the airwaves and the spread of news and discourse.

3 Dec 2012 - 6:39PM

In the most populous country on the planet, a nation where information is heavily controlled, there is perhaps nothing more powerful (or scary) than a state-controlled television network with a near-monopoly on the airwaves and the spread of news and discourse.

Book review: Two Billion Eyes - the Story of China Central Television
Why it pays some to stay in the grey economy