Don't let society's limited set of values keep you from living your dream

Student delivers a message through his video: social values should not be an obstacle when pursuing your interests

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In the video Ignite, the main character, a 14-year-old boy, dreams of being an electronic dance music producer.

Everyone has their own dream: some want to be singers, some want to be artists. However, society has high expectations of our youngsters and expects them to have great achievements.

Many people only work for money, or even give up on their long-term dreams because of work. In this video, Ignite, the main character, a 14-year-old boy, dreams of being an electronic dance music producer. He always carries his laptop with him to create music anytime, anywhere. Through good times and bad, he does not stop composing music and pursuing his dream to become a musician.

Hong Kong is a very competitive city. People are stressed and they work long hours. Students face a lot of pressure. They need to attend – among other things – different extracurricular activities and tutorial classes, besides doing their homework and revision. They barely have time for sports or entertainment or to explore their interests.

Friends are forever

They are pressured by their parents and society to choose a “prestigious” career, such as becoming a doctor or lawyer. Youngsters are not encouraged to pursue their interests as a career. Those who said their dream is to become a singer or music producer are considered unrealistic.

I wanted to deliver a message through my video: that social values should not be an obstacle when pursuing our dreams. We should go for it no matter what. Live your dream and be the person you want to be.

Unicef HK’s “Make A Video” competition gives young people a chance to express themselves. The project is co-organised by the Hong Kong Arts Centre’s IFVA, with support from Hang Seng Bank and Young Post. Check out the videos here. Email your feedback here.

Edited by M. J. Premaratne