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Akanksha Singh
Akanksha Singh
Akanksha Singh is a writer and culture journalist based in Mumbai, India. She has been published in Explore Parts Unknown, HuffPost, The Independent, The Sydney Morning Herald and many more. You can find her written work on akanksha-singh.com

As Indians gasp for air, Modi’s vaccine efforts appear to have done little more than fail Indians and the country’s global standing. Far from being ‘self-reliant’ or the ‘pharmacy to the world’, India’s international image is now one of desperation.

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If Indians believed US-India relations were on solid ground because of the bond between Trump and Modi, what does a Biden-Harris government portend? For Modi, it seems it’s bad news and a political investment gone awry.

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Hindu nationalist trolls claimed the ad, featuring a Hindu-Muslim couple, promoted ‘fake secularism’ and was part of a conspiracy in which Muslim men only marry to convert women to Islam.

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The government’s targeting of the human rights NGO is part of an ongoing campaign that has also involved the arrest of activists, intellectuals and journalists, and is a sign of just how bad things have become.

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Kolkata-born sisters Mrinalika M Bhanj Deo and Akshita M Bhanj Deo promote local art and culture, run a sustainable boutique palace hotel, and embrace eco-tourism

Elected officials have preferred to play the blame game over severe pollution in India’s cities, especially the capital. This should show the world that political sloganeering is not the answer to an increasingly inhospitable climate.

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The Supreme Court judgment allocating the disputed site on which mosque stood until the 1990s to the Hindu community will whet fundamentalist Hindu groups’ appetite for other such plots across the country.

While there has been a backlash against Indian women sharing their experiences of being sexually harassed and the country’s sociocultural complexity makes it hard to evaluate the impact of the movement, it’s clear something has changed.

Indian media can’t get enough of economist Abhijit Banerjee’s mother. As curious as it sounds, in India, where patriarchy is deeply rooted, the mother-son bond is idealised above all others.

The major parties have gone to great lengths to woo the nation’s women with promises of a grand female future, but similar pledges in the past have fallen flat.

With the country witnessing a rise in mob lynchings, fuelled by Hindu nationalism since Modi took office, his pre-election campaign risks fuelling violence.