Craig Addison

Craig Addison has covered Asia technology since 1992. He joined the Post in 2013.
Craig Addison
Craig Addison has covered Asia technology since 1992. He joined the Post in 2013.

Latest from Craig Addison

The View | Why the Made in China 2025 road map to hi-tech supremacy will miss its deadline

China’s leadership has done well to play down the ambitious plan, not just because of the trade war but also because it has become harder to acquire foreign technology, making official targets more difficult to achieve.

2 Oct 2018 - 10:45PM

China’s leadership has done well to play down the ambitious plan, not just because of the trade war but also because it has become harder to acquire foreign technology, making official targets more difficult to achieve.

Why the Made in China 2025 road map to hi-tech supremacy will miss its deadline
The only thing mythical about unicorns these days is their valuation
China reliant on US core technology for some time, but so is the world
Opinion | Why US sanctions on ZTE might turn out to be the best thing for China’s microchip ambitions

Case study from 18 years ago may provide lessons for Chinese telecoms company that has been denied access to US technology.

20 Jul 2018 - 8:47PM

Case study from 18 years ago may provide lessons for Chinese telecoms company that has been denied access to US technology.

Why US sanctions on ZTE might turn out to be the best thing for China’s microchip ambitions
Here’s why China may regret the Pyrrhic victory of winning the  global artificial intelligence race
China is in the kind of technology bubble that helps local firms. Will it last?
Why Donald Trump’s wall will be around China, not Mexico

If there was any doubt Donald Trump would build a wall if elected, it was put to rest at the start of the first US presidential debate this week. Not a Mexican border wall though, but a Chinese one.

10 Nov 2016 - 10:29AM

If there was any doubt Donald Trump would build a wall if elected, it was put to rest at the start of the first US presidential debate this week. Not a Mexican border wall though, but a Chinese one.

Why Donald Trump’s wall will be around China, not Mexico
Letters to the Editor, October 20, 2013

I refer to the report ("Kindergartens prepare for huge mainland influx", October 11) about parents flocking to kindergartens, especially in North District, for application forms.

20 Oct 2013 - 6:31AM

I refer to the report ("Kindergartens prepare for huge mainland influx", October 11) about parents flocking to kindergartens, especially in North District, for application forms.

Letters to the Editor, October 20, 2013
HKU can improve its world ranking by luring elite students

I am disappointed that the University of Hong Kong has dropped more than 20 places in the world top 200 university rankings.

20 Oct 2013 - 6:31AM

I am disappointed that the University of Hong Kong has dropped more than 20 places in the world top 200 university rankings.

HKU can improve its world ranking by luring elite students
Letters to the Editor, October 18, 2013

I am furious at Mr Jake van der Kamp's suggestion ("Journalists out of line with Aquino", October 10) that Hong Kong people should leave behind us the cold-blooded killing of eight Hong Kong tourists in Manila and the gross mishandling by the Philippine government three years ago.

18 Oct 2013 - 12:37PM

I am furious at Mr Jake van der Kamp's suggestion ("Journalists out of line with Aquino", October 10) that Hong Kong people should leave behind us the cold-blooded killing of eight Hong Kong tourists in Manila and the gross mishandling by the Philippine government three years ago.

Letters to the Editor, October 18, 2013
Negative public view of research leaves our scientists undervalued

We have never had a scientist in Hong Kong receiving the Shaw Prize, yet the award originated in our city. So why is that? I think the issue is twofold. The first one is the public attitude towards scientific research. The second issue is the lack of government support.

18 Oct 2013 - 3:09AM

We have never had a scientist in Hong Kong receiving the Shaw Prize, yet the award originated in our city. So why is that? I think the issue is twofold. The first one is the public attitude towards scientific research. The second issue is the lack of government support.

Negative public view of research leaves our scientists undervalued