Pavin Chachavalpongpun

Pavin Chachavalpongpun is an associate professor at Kyoto University’s Centre for Southeast Asian Studies. He is the author of several books, including “Reinventing Thailand: Thaksin and His Foreign Policy”.
Pavin Chachavalpongpun
Pavin Chachavalpongpun is an associate professor at Kyoto University’s Centre for Southeast Asian Studies. He is the author of several books, including “Reinventing Thailand: Thaksin and His Foreign Policy”.

Latest from Pavin Chachavalpongpun

Thai military’s grip on power won’t ease any time soon

The latest postponement of a long-promised general election underlines the junta’s fear of the Shinawatra family’s lingering influence, at a time when the new king is still settling in.

29 Jan 2018 - 8:12PM

The latest postponement of a long-promised general election underlines the junta’s fear of the Shinawatra family’s lingering influence, at a time when the new king is still settling in.

Thai military’s grip on power won’t ease any time soon
Junta’s tight control ensures Thai referendum will be no exercise in democracy
Eye on the throne, Thailand's crown prince appears to be putting his house in order

Thailand's King Bhumibol Adulyadej turns 87 today. Crowned in 1946, he is the world's longest reigning monarch. But the Bhumibol era is coming to an end.

5 Dec 2014 - 1:23PM

Thailand's King Bhumibol Adulyadej turns 87 today. Crowned in 1946, he is the world's longest reigning monarch. But the Bhumibol era is coming to an end.

Eye on the throne, Thailand's crown prince appears to be putting his house in order
Human rights abuses by Thai junta reinforce climate of fear

Since seizing power from an elected government more than three months ago, Thailand's National Council for Peace and Order - the governing body of the coup makers - has continued to violate people's freedoms.

18 Sep 2014 - 12:24AM

Since seizing power from an elected government more than three months ago, Thailand's National Council for Peace and Order - the governing body of the coup makers - has continued to violate people's freedoms.

Human rights abuses by Thai junta reinforce climate of fear
Despite the threats, I will not bow to Thailand's despots

Four days after the Thai military overthrew the elected Puea Thai-led government, King Bhumibol Adulyadej endorsed the coup, giving legitimacy to the unlawful intervention. Indeed, the royal endorsement will be crucial for implementing the junta's cast-iron policies to fully control politics.

20 Jul 2018 - 2:53PM

Four days after the Thai military overthrew the elected Puea Thai-led government, King Bhumibol Adulyadej endorsed the coup, giving legitimacy to the unlawful intervention. Indeed, the royal endorsement will be crucial for implementing the junta's cast-iron policies to fully control politics.

Despite the threats, I will not bow to Thailand's despots
Thai king's birthday raises questions about monarchy's role in politics

King Bhumibol Adulyadej celebrated his 86th birthday yesterday, which was also Thailand's national day. This much-anticipated event came amid escalating political conflict between the Yingluck Shinawatra government backed by her fugitive brother, former prime minister Thaksin, and its opponents in the old establishment camp represented by the elitist opposition, the Democrat Party.

20 Jul 2018 - 2:53PM

King Bhumibol Adulyadej celebrated his 86th birthday yesterday, which was also Thailand's national day. This much-anticipated event came amid escalating political conflict between the Yingluck Shinawatra government backed by her fugitive brother, former prime minister Thaksin, and its opponents in the old establishment camp represented by the elitist opposition, the Democrat Party.

Thai king's birthday raises questions about monarchy's role in politics
Playing Cambodian 'threat' for own gain
Major rethink needed on Myanmar strategy
Road map stops far short of the goal
West can't just dismiss this flawed election
Thaksin bashing won't solve political crisis
Cosy Sino-Thai relations affecting Asean unity
Extradition exposes US bias in foreign policy
Thaksin steps up his role as gadfly
Thailand should brace for more bruising politics
Abhisit should not overlook red menace
Restoring voter trust a way out of the crisis
Nationalists stoking anti-Cambodia anger
Royalists head for the revolving political door
Denial of culpability discredits Abhisit
Verdict in Abhisit murder case will raise a storm in Thailand
Monsoon's return raises political storm in Thailand
Hurdles to Myanmar's democratic reform
UN has taken wrong approach to Myanmar
Myanmar trip signals a more assertive Japan