Your voice: lower Hong Kong’s minimum age for drone users; beware of dangerous TikTok challenges and more (short letters)

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  • One reader is not happy about the Hong Kong government’s decision to introduce new laws for drone users
  • Another wants the government to lower the 70 per cent student and school staff vaccination requirement to resume full-day classes
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Some drone lovers in Hong Kong are not happy about the new drone laws. Photo: Dickson Lee

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Donald Wong Kwong-wa: Drop minimum age for drone users

Yew Chung International School

The Hong Kong government has recently decided to introduce new regulations for drone users, which includes a minimum age of 14 to pilot.

As an 11-year-old owner and pilot of a DJI Mavic Air II, I don’t believe this minimum age rule to be necessary. The drone helps me take high-quality photos and breathtaking videos, and it was easy to operate even for someone as young as I am.

A drone that has the potential to save lives

The government also should provide more distinct rules about whether drones can be flown in public parks. Once, in Sha Tin Park, a staff member stopped me from flying a drone even though the park only prohibits flying kites and model plans. I hope the government will consider my points.

Some Hong Kong teenager want the government to drop the minimum age for drone users. Photo: Martin Chan

Matthew Chow: Let students study something new

Tsuen Wan Public Ho Chuen Yiu Memorial College

There are a total of 27 elective and other language subjects for students to choose from for their Diploma of Secondary Education. However, not every school offers all of these courses. And I believe this needs to change.

It is important that students develop their language skills because it is useful if th

ey go to foreign countries. It can also increase the likelihood of finding jobs in the future.

By taking more elective subjects, students can explore their passions. Instead of only focusing on the core subjects, students can go out of their comfort zone and find what they love.

Some schools have already been providing more subjects for students to choose from, and I hope more schools will follow their example.

The DSE is Hong Kong’s university entrance exam. Photo: Sam Tsang

Isaac Sze: Booster shots are needed now

Carmel Divine Grace Foundation Secondary School

The World Health Organization has recently called for a moratorium on administering Covid-19 booster shots, hoping to vaccinate the most at-risk groups around the world.

While this request is meant to increase vaccine supply for low-income countries, this plan has harmful consequences.

WHO says to avoid Covid-19 booster shot until everyone gets first dose

The second dose may not be enough to fight the delta variant of the coronavirus. By stopping governments from giving people a booster shot, many vaccinated people will not be fully protected, causing more new waves of Covid-19 across the globe.

Allowing people to receive their third dose will increase immunity to the delta strain. Giving booster shots will do more good than harm.

The World Health Organization has recently called for a moratorium on administering Covid-19 booster shots, hoping to vaccinate the most at-risk groups around the world. Photo: Sam Tsang

Bernard Cheung: A life saved is a penny earned

King Ling College

I am writing in response to the article “Doctors beg: Please don’t do the TikTok Milk Crate Challenge” (Young Post, August 26). It describes how people are risking their safety by walking over stacks of milk crates for a short video.

I agree with the doctors, but this is not the only dangerous challenge on TikTok. For instance, in the Penny Challenge, people slide pennies behind a phone charger that is only partially plugged-in. However, the coin can cause sparks when it strikes the metal prongs, and the challenge resulted in fire at a school in the US state of Massachusetts.

There are still many other harmful challenges circulating on TikTok. Even though social media has many other benefits, it is important for everyone to be aware of the potential dangers that could come with challenges making their rounds on social media.

Some people are risking their safety by walking over stacks of milk crates for a short TikTok video. Photo: AFP

Angela Guan Yuk-in: Lower the jabs threshold

CCC Heep Woh College

I am writing in response to the article “Coronavirus: Hong Kong parents want vaccination bar lowered, as school year kicks off without full day of face-to-face classes” (South China Morning Post, September 12).

The government should consider lowering the 70 per cent student vaccination requirement for full-day classes because some are concerned about the side effects of vaccines and some are unable to get jabbed because of health issues or age restrictions.

Coronavirus: Hong Kong students return to campus for half-day lessons

It is crucial to resume full-day classes especially so students can do well on their university entrance exams. After half-day lessons, online classes are provided in the afternoons, but they are not as effective. Students need to be able to learn properly and discuss questions with their teachers.

Some students want the government to consider lowering the 70 per cent student and school staff vaccination requirement for full-day classes. Photo: Winson Wong

Cooby Wong: Our city’s shrinking work force

Carmel Divine Grace Foundation Secondary School

According to the Hong Kong Census and Statistics Department, the elderly population increased from 0.46 million in 1988 to 1.51 million in 2018. With medical advancements, people are living longer.

Because of the city’s high cost of living, fertility rates have decreased, and there are fewer and fewer babies that are born every year. As a result, we have a shrinking work force.

The government should increase the retirement age, so people work longer and contribute to the economy. It should also give subsidies to parents to encourage more people to have children.

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