Samir Nazareth

Samir Nazareth

Samir Nazareth has worked in the development sector and writes on socio-political and environmental issues. He is the author of the travelogue, 1400 Bananas, 76 Towns & 1 Million People.

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Latest from Samir Nazareth

Opinion | Why the Extinction Rebellion is a more successful social movement than the Hong Kong protests

The movements in Britain and Hong Kong involve young people and have met with tough police action. But while the Extinction Rebellion has inspired similar protests around the world, the cause of the Hong Kong protesters is less relatable.

23 Oct 2019 - 9:14AM

The movements in Britain and Hong Kong involve young people and have met with tough police action. But while the Extinction Rebellion has inspired similar protests around the world, the cause of the Hong Kong protesters is less relatable.

Why the Extinction Rebellion is a more successful social movement than the Hong Kong protests
Opinion | What Hong Kong’s largely peaceful protesters can teach demonstrators in India

In contrast to the civic-mindedness on evidence in Hong Kong’s rallies, large-scale protests in India tend towards violence that targets government infrastructure. What accounts for the difference?

17 Jul 2019 - 7:41PM

In contrast to the civic-mindedness on evidence in Hong Kong’s rallies, large-scale protests in India tend towards violence that targets government infrastructure. What accounts for the difference?

What Hong Kong’s largely peaceful protesters can teach demonstrators in India
Opinion | Indian election campaigns have made hate speech and the politics of division the new normal

Politicians trading barbs at election time in the early 2000s has evolved into a vicious stridency in public discourse, even among ordinary Indians, that hinges on identity politics, fuelled by the right-wing vision of India as a Hindu nation.

7 May 2019 - 10:00AM

Politicians trading barbs at election time in the early 2000s has evolved into a vicious stridency in public discourse, even among ordinary Indians, that hinges on identity politics, fuelled by the right-wing vision of India as a Hindu nation.

Indian election campaigns have made hate speech and the politics of division the new normal