Kalinga Seneviratne
Kalinga Seneviratne
Dr Kalinga Seneviratne is a Sri Lankan-born journalist, media analyst and international communications expert currently based in Sydney.

Thousands of Indians were taken to Fiji by British colonialists to be sugar cane workers; their descendants are now under threat, as they own little land, there’s far less sugar production, and Chinese businesses are arriving.

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With the country’s two biggest parties suffering major losses, the new Labor government will need the support of independent MPs to pass legislation. The independents who have taken the election by storm are mostly women with a strong focus on green policy and greater government accountability.

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Vaccine inequity is prolonging the pandemic by allowing room for the virus to mutate and spread, experts say. IP rights for vaccines must be lifted not only for humane reasons, but also on social justice grounds.

Prime Minister Scott Morrison faces heavy criticism for proposals that appear focused on keeping fossil fuel firms and domestic voters happy. His government relies heavily on rural farming and mining communities for votes, making aggressive climate policy unlikely.

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In fighting the ‘war on terror’, the West has seen its democratic rights and freedoms eroded. With much of the international community fed up with the West’s weaponising of human rights, China is pushing back with its own definition of democracy.

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Beijing’s partners in Europe and Southeast Asia command much attention at the Belt and Road Forum, but there is much China-backed development in Central Asia – and much concern over whether Kyrgyzstan will pay back the billions it has borrowed.

Beijing and Canberra have been quick to deny that politics is behind the delays that have hit Australian coal imports. To sceptics, it’s a case of protesting too much.

Prevailing media narrative does not reveal the internal tensions and external pressures that saw former PM Ranil Wickremesinghe sacked, while new leader Mahinda Rajapakse’s budget later this month could legitimise his rule