Minxin Pei

Minxin Pei is professor of government at Claremont McKenna College and a non-resident senior fellow at the German Marshall Fund of the United States. He is the author of China's Crony Capitalism.
Minxin Pei
Minxin Pei is professor of government at Claremont McKenna College and a non-resident senior fellow at the German Marshall Fund of the United States. He is the author of China's Crony Capitalism.

Latest from Minxin Pei

Opinion | Xi Jinping’s intolerance of dissent within government heightens the risk of Chinese policy mistakes

The dismissal of an outspoken reformist official reflects a profound change, under Xi, in the way Chinese leaders govern: from a collective decision-making process in which disagreements and debate were allowed, to a centralised leadership style in which loyalty and conformity are prized.

18 Apr 2019 - 5:01AM

The dismissal of an outspoken reformist official reflects a profound change, under Xi, in the way Chinese leaders govern: from a collective decision-making process in which disagreements and debate were allowed, to a centralised leadership style in which loyalty and conformity are prized.

Xi Jinping’s intolerance of dissent within government heightens the risk of Chinese policy mistakes
Opinion | Donald Trump demands US allies join his Huawei blacklist, but what is he offering in return?

The Trump administration’s America-first agenda is not compatible with its new cold war, which requires allies to forgo Chinese technology at their own expense.

22 Mar 2019 - 9:32AM

The Trump administration’s America-first agenda is not compatible with its new cold war, which requires allies to forgo Chinese technology at their own expense.

Donald Trump demands US allies join his Huawei blacklist, but what is he offering in return?
Opinion | US-China trade war is more about geopolitical rivalry, such as in the South China Sea, than soybeans

The decoupling of the American and Chinese economies would not only have grave economic consequences globally, but also unleash unfettered US-China rivalry. Beijing needs to make strategic, not simply trade-related, concessions to avoid this.

20 Feb 2019 - 6:31AM

The decoupling of the American and Chinese economies would not only have grave economic consequences globally, but also unleash unfettered US-China rivalry. Beijing needs to make strategic, not simply trade-related, concessions to avoid this.

US-China trade war is more about geopolitical rivalry, such as in the South China Sea, than soybeans
Opinion | As China ups its influence abroad, the West must count on the power of its democratic values to prevail

Instead of reacting with suspicion to anything connected with China, Western democracies should focus on the strength of their own democratic processes, such as transparency.

14 Dec 2018 - 6:51PM

Instead of reacting with suspicion to anything connected with China, Western democracies should focus on the strength of their own democratic processes, such as transparency.

As China ups its influence abroad, the West must count on the power of its democratic values to prevail
Opinion | Why China’s East Asian charm offensive will need more than sweet talk and trade deals to succeed

As geopolitical tensions with the US rise and China seeks friends in the neighbourhood, concessions in the South China Sea will go further than trade deals and sweet talk.

17 Apr 2019 - 12:12AM

As geopolitical tensions with the US rise and China seeks friends in the neighbourhood, concessions in the South China Sea will go further than trade deals and sweet talk.

Why China’s East Asian charm offensive will need more than sweet talk and trade deals to succeed
Opinion | As the US and China seek to win the trade war, the whole world could end up the loser on climate change

A global effort is essential to prevent catastrophic changes in the climate, which can’t happen if China and the US form competing orders

23 Oct 2018 - 2:36PM

A global effort is essential to prevent catastrophic changes in the climate, which can’t happen if China and the US form competing orders

As the US and China seek to win the trade war, the whole world could end up the loser on climate change
China would be wise to avoid going MAD in the trade war
Opinion | Two lessons for China on how to avoid a Soviet-style collapse in its new cold war with the US

Beijing is on track to lose its new cold war with the US, as it is failing to recognise and rectify the two mistakes that proved fatal for the Soviet Union: economic mismanagement and imperial overreach.

29 Sep 2018 - 2:36PM

Beijing is on track to lose its new cold war with the US, as it is failing to recognise and rectify the two mistakes that proved fatal for the Soviet Union: economic mismanagement and imperial overreach.

Two lessons for China on how to avoid a Soviet-style collapse in its new cold war with the US
Trump’s rise leaves China ideologically safe but facing graver security risks
Can Xi Jinping offer enough on his state visit to mend the rift in Sino-US relations?
Rooting out PLA corruption is helping Xi Jinping to build his power base
Beijing sees only a distorted version of the Singapore model
China's self-defeating crackdown on 'Western values'

The news from the mainland these days is mostly depressing, owing to the government's escalating crackdown on its critics.

13 Feb 2015 - 6:37AM

The news from the mainland these days is mostly depressing, owing to the government's escalating crackdown on its critics.

China's self-defeating crackdown on 'Western values'
The Communist Party survived Tiananmen, but does it have the tools to last another 25 years?

It may be hard to imagine, but 25 years ago, the Chinese Communist Party was nearly toppled by a nationwide pro-democracy movement. It was the late paramount leader Deng Xiaoping's steely nerves and the tanks of the People's Liberation Army that enabled the regime to avoid collapse, at the cost of several hundred civilian lives.

29 May 2014 - 4:32AM

It may be hard to imagine, but 25 years ago, the Chinese Communist Party was nearly toppled by a nationwide pro-democracy movement. It was the late paramount leader Deng Xiaoping's steely nerves and the tanks of the People's Liberation Army that enabled the regime to avoid collapse, at the cost of several hundred civilian lives.

The Communist Party survived Tiananmen, but does it have the tools to last another 25 years?
Zhou Yongkang case set to expose the scale of the rot in China's elite politics

Less than 18 months after becoming general secretary of the Chinese Communist Party, Xi Jinping is poised to cage the biggest political "tiger" - a corrupt top official - in the history of the People's Republic.

20 Jul 2018 - 2:53PM

Less than 18 months after becoming general secretary of the Chinese Communist Party, Xi Jinping is poised to cage the biggest political "tiger" - a corrupt top official - in the history of the People's Republic.

Zhou Yongkang case set to expose the scale of the rot in China's elite politics
Xi Jinping's three challenges

Since ascending to the Communist Party's top post in 2012, Xi Jinping has confounded observers. While his political strategy has entailed tightening the party's control over ideology, cracking down on official corruption, repressing dissent and championing a more nationalistic foreign policy, he has announced an unusually bold economic reform blueprint.

13 Jan 2014 - 4:47AM

Since ascending to the Communist Party's top post in 2012, Xi Jinping has confounded observers. While his political strategy has entailed tightening the party's control over ideology, cracking down on official corruption, repressing dissent and championing a more nationalistic foreign policy, he has announced an unusually bold economic reform blueprint.

Xi Jinping's three challenges
What's the real test to Xi Jinping and the Communist Party at the Third Plenum?
Reconcilable differences
25 Feb 2011 - 12:00AM
Reconcilable differences
A more confident Chinese people tests Communist Party rule
In hot pursuit of China's princelings

China's "princelings" - the offspring of senior Chinese officials who benefit from lavish privileges in education, employment and business - are coming under scrutiny as never before. Bo Xilai, the son of one of Mao Zedong's comrades and a supposed "immortal" of the revolution, was recently sentenced to life in prison after his conviction on charges of corruption and abuse of power.

14 Oct 2013 - 3:09AM

China's "princelings" - the offspring of senior Chinese officials who benefit from lavish privileges in education, employment and business - are coming under scrutiny as never before. Bo Xilai, the son of one of Mao Zedong's comrades and a supposed "immortal" of the revolution, was recently sentenced to life in prison after his conviction on charges of corruption and abuse of power.

In hot pursuit of China's princelings
Chance to make amends
1 Jan 2011 - 12:00AM
Chance to make amends
Why Bo Xilai won't go quietly

As show trials go, the drama featuring Bo Xilai , the once-swaggering, media-savvy former Communist Party chief of Chongqing , veered anomalously into improvisation. Before the proceedings began, the conventional wisdom was that Bo's trial had been carefully scripted and rehearsed to portray a forlorn and penitent sinner confessing his crimes and apologising to the party.

30 Aug 2013 - 3:11AM

As show trials go, the drama featuring Bo Xilai , the once-swaggering, media-savvy former Communist Party chief of Chongqing , veered anomalously into improvisation. Before the proceedings began, the conventional wisdom was that Bo's trial had been carefully scripted and rehearsed to portray a forlorn and penitent sinner confessing his crimes and apologising to the party.

Why Bo Xilai won't go quietly
Xi will be pushed to make good on his China Dream

Ruling elites almost everywhere - whether in democracies or in authoritarian regimes - believe that clever sloganeering can inspire their people and legitimise their power. There are, of course, crucial differences. In functioning democracies, government leaders can be held accountable for their promises: the press can scrutinise their policies, opposition parties are motivated to show that the party in power lies and cheats. As a result, incumbents are frequently forced to carry out at least some of their promises.

19 Apr 2013 - 2:48AM

Ruling elites almost everywhere - whether in democracies or in authoritarian regimes - believe that clever sloganeering can inspire their people and legitimise their power. There are, of course, crucial differences. In functioning democracies, government leaders can be held accountable for their promises: the press can scrutinise their policies, opposition parties are motivated to show that the party in power lies and cheats. As a result, incumbents are frequently forced to carry out at least some of their promises.

Xi will be pushed to make good on his China Dream